How Long Does A 6 Gallon Water Heater Take To Heat Up - ERNIEGRAVES | Process Measurement & Control (2022)

How long does it take a 6 gallon water heater to heat?

By combining the two forms of heat, you can heat your water at a pace of around 17.8 gallons per hour. A 6 gallon water heater will heat at 17.8 gallons per hour and will take 20 minutes to reach its full temperature, assuming it is not overheated. If you have a 10 gallon tank, it will take around 33 minutes to reach its maximum temperature. To view the complete response, please click here. Another question is, how long does it take for a hot water heater to heat up once it has been installed.

The average electric heater takes around twice as long to fully heat up the water in its tank as the average gas heater, so you can anticipate it to take between an hour and an hour and 20 minutes to fully heat up the water in its tank.

60 to 80 minutes is a reasonable estimate.

around one hour and twenty minutes How long does it take for water to become heated in an immersion tank?

This is dependent on the quality of yourtankas well as the type of insulation you have installed.

6 gal water heater and shower time

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07-15-2019, 04:06 PM1
Junior MemberJoin Date: Aug 2016Posts: 46 gal water heater and shower time

Good day to all.The question I am about to ask is I guess simple to answer in some ways but being that we have not pulled the trigger to buy a motorhome I am doing as much home work as I can to help answer my wife’s questions.so here we go: Now I know that this answer will very depending on amount of time spent in the shower.How long can one expect to get hot water from there 6 gal hot water heater for a shower. Also how long does it usually take for the water heater to re-heat after someone takes a shower.I know silly question but really I cant answer this question.Thank you for your time to answer.looking forward to the future on the road.

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07-15-2019, 04:12 PM2
Senior MemberMonaco Owners Club Fleetwood Owners ClubJoin Date: Sep 2016Location: Manitoba, CanadaPosts: 918My personal experience with a 6 gallon tank, about 5 minutes comfortably with continuous water flow. Takes around 45 minutes to reheat fully depending on water temperature entering tank. Well water here never really warms up much.The 12 gallon tank I had in fifth wheel was almost unlimited in comparison. Or at least it seemed like it.Terry_2002 Monaco Windsor 40PKD. Marjorie 2.2015 Equinox V6 Roadmaster tow setup2019 ALP Adventurer 24DS for the short trips. April, 2021
07-15-2019, 04:18 PM3
Junior MemberJoin Date: Oct 2018Posts: 16We bought our very first RV last July. This was one of the key lessons we learned on our first trip. With the shower running non-stop, ours is usually out of hot water in 8-10 minutes?)I believe our water heater tank is 6 gallons) These type of showers are long enough for us when out camping, but it takes about 20-25 minutes to reheat the hot water tank.
07-15-2019, 04:30 PM4
Senior MemberJoin Date: May 2017Location: Vancouver WashPosts: 7,230If you use both propane and electricity at the same time, it shortens reheat time.
07-15-2019, 04:36 PM5
Senior MemberJoin Date: Aug 2011Posts: 4,7196 gal water heater and shower time

.depending on what motorhome you buy, some models come with tankless water heaters, and others come with �aqua hot� or �oasis� systems which can provide unlimited hot water on demand. just something else to think about.in case the 6 or 10 gallon water heaters seem too limiting in their capacity.

07-15-2019, 04:45 PM6
Registered UserFord Super Duty OwnerJoin Date: Nov 2014Location: NW OhioPosts: 7,114We don’t leave the water heater on.When shower time, we turn it on, takes ten minutes or so to heat up. We then turn it off.Navy shower. Turn the water on, wet down turn the water off, soap up, scrub, etc, turning the water on/off as needed. Then rinse.We can usually both take a shower before we run out of hot water.
07-15-2019, 05:14 PM7
Registered UserJoin Date: Dec 1969Posts: 1,964The short answer is if you have to ask your wife is not going to like showering in your RV. The long answer is a learning experience.In the navy there were three kinds of showers. No showers, navy showers, and Hollywood showers.On my first ship we could not make enough water and we did not take showers while at sea. On my subsequent ships we took navy showers at sea. Get wet and turn off the water. Soap up. Turn on the water and rinse off.In port you could take a Hollywood shower using as much hot water as you wanted.I like Hollywood showers. If you want one in an RV, park at places that have nice showers.Our first MH had a 6 gallon hot water tank and our present 10 gallon. Both were heated by the engine when driving. Propane when camping. The third option is 120 vac.My shower routine is to turn on the propane 10-15 minutes before getting into the shower to start with the water temperature as high as I can get it.I start with a navy shower. Get wet and turn of the water. If I am running self contained I minimize how long I rinse. If I have hook ups, rinse with hot water for longer. With a 6 gallon tank I would start to run out of water. With a ten gallon tank you can go even longer.Bottom line is a ten gallon tank is better but not a deciding factor.
07-15-2019, 05:45 PM8
Senior MemberJoin Date: Feb 2018Posts: 1,197If you aren’t connected to plumbing, water heater size is less of an issue compared to tank sizes.We camp off the grid mostly. We try to take showers with less than 2 gallons per person so we can mange the fresh and grey tanks the longest. It is mostly a sponge bath with a little more water for the final rinse. I use a small stainless bowl, dipping cup, camp duds and a handiwipe. I put a quart or so in the bowl, put duds on wipe, wet wipe, apply to skin, and do a second wipe with a rinsed wipe and repeat until body is clean., Dipping cup allows you to pull fresh water out of the bowl and lets the dirtier water go to the drain. I finish with a little shampoo in my limited hair and quickly rinse my head and body for the finish.We use the same technique using a bear can for water hold when out backpacking in the wilderness. We just pick an isolated spot in the sun on a piece of granite when backpacking. The bear can allows us to haul the water several hundred feet from the stream so we don’t contaminate it. The sun warms up the water for an hour or so before using it.We used to do this outdoors in a pop-up shelter, car camping before the camper. We would use a 2 gallon bucket with water warmed on a stove and battery powered shower head. I don’t have much hair and my wife keeps hers tailer short so that helps._Jeff-Arctic Fox 22G w/1440 watts solar/GMC2500HD Double Cab with Leer Cap w/265 watts solar
07-15-2019, 06:18 PM9
Senior MemberJoin Date: Nov 2015Posts: 20,113Atwood 6 gallon uses a 8,800 btu burner and a 1400W elementElement has recovery time of 6.2 gal/hr based on initial fill with 70*F waterPropane has recovery time of 11.6 gal/hrBoth at same time -17.8 gal/hrAtwood 10 gallon -10,000 btu burner/1400W elementElement.6.2 gal/hrPropane.13.5 gal/hrBoth.19.7 gal/hrSuburban 6 gallon uses a 12,000 btu burner and a 1440W element so should be faster recovery BUT Electric is 6 gal/hr Propane is 10.2 gal/hrBoth at same time is 16.2 gal/hrSuburban 10 gal -12,000 btu burner/1440W elementElectric is 6 gal/hrPropane is 10.2 gal/hrBoth is 16.2(Same ratings as 6 gal tank)Shorter reheat times if water is already hot.20-30 minutes**Suburban Combustion/exhaust chamber is stacked and on far right side of tank where as the Atwood Combustion/Exhaust Chamber is diagonal from bottom right to top left of tank -hence more surface contact area/heat transfer using lower btu burner. Elements roughly the sameAtwood 10 gal best bang for the buck (GC10A-4E)Better unit would be one with ‘heat exchanger’-hot coolant from Engine heats while drivingGCH10A-4E_Is it time for YOUR Medication or Mine?Dodge 3500 w/Tractor MotorNUWA 5vrUS NAVY-USS Decatur DDG-31
07-15-2019, 06:31 PM10
Senior MemberJoin Date: Sep 2013Posts: 852Quote:Originally Posted bypatspage04Good day to all.The question I am about to ask is I guess simple to answer in some ways but being that we have not pulled the trigger to buy a motorhome I am doing as much home work as I can to help answer my wife’s questions.so here we go: Now I know that this answer will very depending on amount of time spent in the shower.How long can one expect to get hot water from there 6 gal hot water heater for a shower. Also how long does it usually take for the water heater to re-heat after someone takes a shower.I know silly question but really I cant answer this question.Thank you for your time to answer.looking forward to the future on the road.If you have not pulled the trigger yet. suggest you also look at MH with aqua hot system. You get hot water all day long. Our previous MH had a 6 gallon tank and we will never go back to that. Plus. it heats the inside of the coach so much better than propane._U.S. Army Retired, 2002 Beaver Patriot Thunder40 Ft, CAT C12, 455 HP, 1550 Ft Lbs Torque Towing 2019 Chevy Equinox, AWD Turbo Diesel
07-16-2019, 10:47 AM11
Senior Member/RVM90Monaco Owners ClubJoin Date: Nov 2002Location: Columbus, MSPosts: 49,628Hi! Welcome to IRV2! We’re sure glad you joined the gang!Noticed you are kinda new on IRV2 and wanted to say hello!My WH is a 10 gallon so I can’t really answer that question. We run it on AC all the time, and just before taking showers we also turn on the propane. It’s OK to run both at the same time! The recovery is faster that way!Good luck, happy trails, and God bless!_JoeAnnetteSometimes I sits and thinks, sometimes I just sits.2002 Monaco Windsor 40PBT, 2013 Honda CRV AWD
07-16-2019, 12:25 PM12
Senior MemberJoin Date: Dec 2017Location: Sacramento, CaliforniaPosts: 1,402If we have full hookups the water heater can handle a full shower easily. Otherwise its get wet, turn off, soap up, and rinse. Mostly limited by the waste tanks, not hot water.
07-16-2019, 12:49 PM13
Senior MemberJoin Date: Nov 2014Posts: 221Hello Patspage04All good input from fellow RVers. Both the Oasis and Aquahot are “On Demand” water heaters that burn diesel to give you continous hot water for showers. A 10 gallon works well, as most have stated. I can attest to this as I have a 10 gallon in my coach. However, another solution if you found a MH with a 6 gallon tank is to replace it with a Truma On Demand tank, about $2K (cost and installation). Do not look at other mfgs., since they all have reported problems. The main thing with on demand types is water pressure. If you plan to boondock, then stay away from on demand types – they simply do not work well with lower water pressures. If staying at standard RV parks where you are connected to city water, then enjoy the “Hollywood Shower”. You simply will not run out of hot water. Down side is they do consume a bit of propane gas. A small price to keep the wife happy.Best RegardsDutch Master2008 Newmar Kountry Star 3960
07-16-2019, 08:23 PM14
Senior MemberJoin Date: Aug 2004Location: Wherever we arePosts: 4,162If you are thinking about a MH with a 6gal water heater, just make sure it can run on elec/propane at the same time. This SHOULD provide enough how water for showers, assuming you are fairly quick about the process. Incoming water temp has a lot to do with it also._’16 40QBH Phaeton’15 38RSSA Mobile Suites-traded’05 36TK3 Mobile Suites-retired but not forgotten
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Water Heater Recovery Heat Up Times Comparison Chart

Recovery of Waste Water from Water Heaters Heat Up Times Compared to One Another Time Required for Water Heater to Come to Temperature There isn’t much that can ruin your day quite as quickly as taking an ice cold shower, and if you have the wrong hot water heater, this might become your new normal very soon. In the event that your current heating unit fails on you, don’t let your stress over the situation lead you to make the wrong choice for a replacement. Prior to selecting a hot water heater, take into consideration how long it will take for the water heater of your choice to heat up completely.

The question is, how long does it take a hot water heater to reheat water once it has been depleted?

Water Heater TypeTime to Heat Back Up
Gas – Conventional Tank30-45 mins
Gas Tankless0 mins
Electric – Conventional Tank60-80 mins
Electric Tankless0 mins

Water Heaters Powered by Natural Gas Specifications for a Gas Conventional Water Heater Once the water is in the tank, the normal gas tank water heater will take 30 to 40 minutes to heat it up to the desired temperature. When new water from your water supply is fed into the tank, this early heat up occurs as a result of the incoming water. Some mathematical calculations are required to provide a more specific explanation of why this takes 30 minutes. The size of the heater’s tank is obviously important, since more water will take longer to heat than a smaller tank.

  1. In simple terms, a BTU is the amount of heat required to elevate one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit in temperature.
  2. For example, the typical hot water heating unit tank holds 40 gallons of water.
  3. Thirty-five gallons times 8.3 pounds per gallon is 330 pounds of water.
  4. For the sake of not having to get into full-blown thermodynamics calculations, we may simplify and say that a 40,000 BTU system with a 40-gallon tank needs half a minute to heat each gallon, which results in a half-hour heat up time.
  5. For those with larger tanks or lower BTU ratings, on the other hand, it will take longer to heat their tanks.
  6. Likewise, keep in mind that this is the amount of time it takes for new cold water to be heated in your tank, so plan accordingly.

When all of the warm water in the tank has been consumed, the length of time it takes to warm up additional water is taken into consideration. It will be necessary to restart the gas tank water heater at that point in order to heat new water from the entering groundwater temperature level.

A gas tank hot water heater will take roughly 40 minutes to warm up new inbound water for the very first time.

Specifications for an Electric Conventional Water Heater When compared to gas tank hot water heaters, electric tank hot water heaters often require double the amount of time to heat water. Electric components, while often more cost-effective, are just incapable of matching the high performance of gas-fired systems. It would take approximately one hour for an electric hot water heater to heat the 40-gallon tank shown above from the moment brand-new water is introduced into the system. As a result, homes with higher water needs are more likely to choose for a whole-house gas tank water heater rather than an electric model.

  • A tank hot water heater that uses electricity takes 60-80 minutes to heat water, but a tank hot water heater that uses gas takes 30 minutes.
  • Unless the system is malfunctioning, this should not take more than a few seconds for a typical-sized house to complete the cycle.
  • Due to the fact that a tankless gas heater heats water instantaneously, it should only take a few seconds for the warm water to travel through the pipes and into the component.
  • For the most part, water does not become heated until the dishwashing machine or hot water faucet is turned on.
  • Due to the fact that a tankless electrical heater warms water fast, it should only take a few seconds for the warm water to make its way through your pipes and into your fixture.
  • Temperature of the incoming water-For both tankless and tank-style hot water heaters, the temperature of the incoming water will determine how long it takes for the water to heat up to the desired temperature. Due to the fact that tank heating systems conserve water while still maintaining a constant temperature, the incoming temperature should not have a significant impact. Tankless heating systems, on the other hand, supply incoming water as needed only a few seconds before it is released from the faucet. This suggests that if the groundwater temperature level is really low, the water may not heat up as quickly as it otherwise would. When the ambient temperature in the room or area where the heaters are housed is excessively cold, both types of heaters might be adversely affected. Water heater settings-Although water heaters appear to be relatively simple when compared to other household mechanicals, they often require more effort to operate properly. Whether your heating unit isn’t operating properly, a professional may be required to inspect it and determine if any settings or calibrations have been altered that are negatively impacting its performance. Issues with age and maintenance are similar. If your heating system is like any other mechanical equipment, the age and quality of your system might have an influence on its efficiency, including the amount of time it takes to warm up. In addition, a lack of simple maintenance, such as interrupting work to wipe out silt that may have accumulated in the pipes, might result in decreased efficiency. Those who live in areas with hard water are more likely to encounter pipeline sediment. While it’s easy for the end user to forget, hot water travels from the ground to your home’s plumbing system, where it passes through the heating unit and pipes before reaching the faucet. When your bathroom is located a considerable distance away from the heating system, it is possible that the warm water may take longer to reach there. This should be represented by a knowledgeable technician while setting your system, so it should not be a source of undue anxiety. Along with the length of piping, the width of your pipes may also have an impact on how long it takes your water heater to heat up properly. In that it can carry more water, a larger pipe is advantageous, but it will take more water to be heated before the pressure rises up sufficiently to allow it to push through the remainder of the pipeline system.

In conclusion, there is a heater that is suitable for any situation. Consider your requirements before selecting a storage tank, whether traditional or tankless in design. Please remember that South End Plumbing provides all plumbing services and that we are only a mouse click away.

(Video) Common Water Heater Myths Answered | Ask This Old House

We also specialize in tankless water heaters; please contact us for more information. South End Plumbing is one of the few organizations that will provide you with a no-obligation quote. To book a visit, please call us at 704-919-1722 or complete the online form.

How Long Does it Take for Electric & Gas Water Heaters to Heat Up?

An ice cold shower is one of the few things that can completely derail your day, and if you have the improper water heater, this might become your new normal. If your present heater is on its last legs, don’t allow the stress of the circumstance push you into making the wrong decision about your new heater. Before you purchase a water heater, take into consideration how long it will take for your water heater of choice to reach operating temperature. If you want to run a large amount of hot water at the same time, you’ll need a more powerful system than if you merely want to take a hot shower on a consistent basis.

In spite of the numerous variables that might influence the time required, the chart below illustrates the average time required for each kind of water heater to heat up.

How Long It Takes A Water Heater to Heat Up For The First Time

Water Heater TypeTime Takes to Heat Up
Gas Tank30-40 minutes
Gas Tankless0 minutes *
Electric Tank60-80 minutes
Electric Tankless0 minutes *

*If the tankless water heater is appropriately designed and placed, it may offer practically immediate heat. Source of the graph

How Long Does it Take for a Gas Water Heater to Heat Up?

Once the water has entered the tank, the normal gas tank heater will take around 30 to 40 minutes to heat it. When you first fill the tank with water from your plumbing supply, the tank will heat up for a few minutes. A more detailed explanation of why this takes 30 minutes necessitates the use of mathematics. The size of the heater’s tank is obviously important, since more water will take longer to heat than a smaller tank. The BTU (or British Thermal Unit) rating of the heater is the next most important consideration.

  • A heater with a higher BTU rating will heat water more quickly.
  • Each gallon of water contains around 8.3 pounds of water; as a result, our sample tank has approximately 330 pounds of water to heat.
  • If the water is at 60 degrees and you want to bring it up to 120 degrees, you will need to raise the temperature by 60 degrees to do this.
  • Because of the lower tank size and greater BTU rating, your hot water heater’s warm-up time will be significantly reduced.
  • You will need to keep the following criteria in mind if you want a high-efficiency water heater that will heat your water in the period of time you specify (after it has run out of hot water) and hold a significant volume of hot water.
  • The first time you switch on the hot water after your tank has been holding hot water for a while, you should get hot water in a matter of minutes because tanks store pre-heated water, not minutes or hours.

That’s when the gas tank water heater will have to start heating new water from the temperature of the entering groundwater again, which will take longer. In order for a gas tank water heater to heat up new incoming water for the first time, it will take roughly 30 minutes.

How Long Does it Take an Electric Hot Water Heater to Heat Up?

When compared to its gas equivalents, electric tank water heaters often need double the length of time to heat water. Despite the fact that electric components are often more cost-effective, they cannot match with the great performance of gas-fired systems. It would take approximately one hour for an electric water heater to heat the 40-gallon tank indicated above from the moment new water is introduced. As a result, homes with higher water needs are more likely to choose for a whole-house gas tank water heater rather than an electric model.

When it comes to heating water, an electric tank water heater takes 60-80 minutes, compared to 30 minutes for a gas tank water heater.

How Long Does it Take a Tankless Gas Heater To Warm Up?

Tankless water heaters heat your water on demand, which means that the distance between your heater and the device you are using is the only factor that defines how long it will take for you to obtain hot water from your faucet. Ideally, this should not take more than a few seconds with a typical-sized house if the system is functioning properly. It may take a few extra seconds for the water to travel through the water pipes and reach appliances that are located further away from the heater in a large home.

How Long Does it Take a Tankless Electric Heater To Warm Up?

Tankless electric water heaters work in a similar way to tankless gas water heaters in that they only begin to heat your water when an item requires it. This means that unless you turn on the dishwasher or turn on the faucet, the water will not be warmed. The majority of the time, an electric tankless heater will give hot water in a matter of seconds, but they can take a fraction of the time that gas systems do owing to the greater strength of gas heat. Because a tankless electric heater warms water instantaneously, it should only take a few seconds for the hot water to flow through your pipes and into your fixture once it has been heated.

Factors That Affect Heat Up Time

Apart from the variables we’ve already covered, such as tank size and BTU rating, there are a variety of other elements that might influence how long it takes your water heater to heat water for the first time.

(Video) Aquarium heaters complete guide - all you need to know about fish tank heater

  • Temperature of the incoming water– For both tankless and tank-style water heaters, the temperature of the incoming water will play a role in determining the amount of time it takes to heat up. Because tank heaters retain water and maintain a constant temperature, the entering temperature should have little effect on them. Instead than storing water in tanks, tankless heaters deliver incoming water on demand, only minutes before it flows out of your faucet. In other words, if the groundwater temperature is really low, the water may not heat up as quickly as it could otherwise. Neither kind of heater is impervious to the effects of extremely cold ambient temperatures in the room or area where they are housed
  • Nevertheless, the former is more vulnerable. Water heater settings– Although water heaters appear to be rather basic when compared to other household mechanicals, they frequently have a number of additional features. Whether your heater isn’t operating properly, a professional may be required to inspect it and determine if any settings or calibrations have been altered that are negatively effecting its performance. Maintenance / Expenditure Issues– In the same way that any other mechanical equipment ages and degrades over time, the age and condition of your heater may eventually impact its performance, including how long it takes to heat up. A lack of routine maintenance, particularly a failure to wipe out silt that may have accumulated in the pipes, might also result in performance problems. Those who live in places with hard water are more prone to encounter pipe sediment. When it comes to distance from the appliance, it’s easy for the end user to forget that your hot water is going from the ground to your heater and via the pipes in your home before it reaches the item you are now using. The greater the distance between your appliance and the water heater, the longer it may take for the hot water to reach it. This should be taken into consideration by a knowledgeable installation when setting up your system, so it should not be a significant problem. Pipe Diameter– In addition to the length of the piping, the width of your water pipes may have an impact on how long it takes for the water heater to heat up completely. The use of a broader pipe is advantageous because it can carry more water
  • But, it will take more water to be heated before the pressure is high enough to force the water through the remaining pipe system.

In conclusion, there is a heater out there that is appropriate for everyone. Be sure to consider your requirements before picking either a traditional tank or a tankless system. See our assessment of the top models on the market now that you know how long it takes for both gas and electric water heaters to heat up. With amazing brands like Bosch, Rheem, and Takagi, you’re sure to find something that works for your needs!

RV Hot Water Heaters (11 Mistakes to Avoid and Handy Tips)

Before embarking on a vacation in your RV, there are a few things you should be aware of about your hot water heater in order to prevent making any costly mistakes.

As a result, here are 11 recommendations to ensure that your hot water heater is a success on your journey! What are the top 11 errors to avoid while using an RV hot water heater, as well as some helpful hints?

  1. Remove a foul odor from a cycle water heater by following these steps: Reduce the heat to save money on propane
  2. Ensure that the RV has enough water
  3. Drain the water heater while it is not in use to prevent leaking. Install a bypass valve on your RV’s hot water heater and drain the water heater before winterizing your RV. Drain and flush your RV twice a year
  4. After winterizing your RV, turn the bypass valve back off. Install an anode rod if necessary. Don’t let the hot water go to waste! Make use of it sparingly
  5. If the Pressure Temperature Valve is dripping, here’s what to do:

Because most RV water heaters operate on propane gas to begin with, it is essential to take care to ensure that your water heater is in perfect operating order. We will go into further depth regarding each tip or error that might be made, as well as how to get the greatest possible outcomes in the future.

1. How to Get Rid of a Bad Smell- Cycle Water Heater?

It’s true that there’s an unpleasant odor emanating from the water. Isn’t that disgusting? What could possible be wrong in there, you would wonder? This is due to the sulfur in the water reacting with the electro-galvanic activity of the hydrogen in the water, causing the reaction. It does not necessarily imply that there are eggs crammed down the drain. The water supply should be turned off and the water heater should be drained in order to resolve the problem. Then replace the drain plug with a brand new one.

Putting this solution in many times, cycling it in about four times, will be required.

After you’ve placed this in, drain the water and cleanse the system to get rid of everything.

After that, fill the tank with fresh water to finish it out.

Tip: How to avoid smelling bad smells from the Water Heater

Drain and clean your water heater on a regular basis if you want to keep unpleasant odors at a minimum. This rotten egg stench is produced when the water and sulfur are allowed to mingle in the tank for an extended period of time. When you flush and drain frequently, you may get rid of the bacteria that is the source of the problem.

2. Turn Down the Heat to Save on Propane

Because some recreational vehicles (RVs) utilize propane for their water heater, it will be necessary to purchase the gas that will be consumed throughout the heating process. The reason I recommend turning down the heat is to save gas. The less propane consumed, the less propane you will need to purchase, resulting in a savings in money. Simply choose not to heat the water all the way up on the hot side, but rather to heat it only on the warm side instead of the entire hot side. If you opt to use less heat in your shower or dishes, you will actually save money in the long term since you will not be washing them at the same temperature as at home.

Electricity appears to be more convenient, but it is also beneficial if you have a heater that will draw heat from the engine, since it is putting that heat to good use while you are driving.

(Video) Water Heater Not Heating? Thermostat Testing

3. Fill RV With Enough Water

In order for your RV water heater to function properly, you must first fill it with enough water to ensure that it has enough water to heat the water. Water heaters are often designed to automatically fill to the appropriate level when connected to a water supply if they are not winterized or bypassed during storage. A word of caution: do not switch on the hot water heater until it has been completely filled with water.

It will suffer as a result of this. Whenever you are not linked to a water supply, the water pump will come in helpful to do the same task; however, you must ensure that the heater is fully stocked before turning it on. In order to switch on your RV’s water heater, follow these steps:

  1. Connect the RV’s water supply to a connection (such as a hose)
  2. Check that the water filter is in place and that the valve connection is open. If additional water is required for the freshwater tank, do so. Check the water heater’s control panel to ensure that it is properly connected
  3. Make certain that the water heater is turned off. You may then switch on the water pump and turn on a hot water faucet to complete the process. If water is flowing through the facet, you should be fine to go
  4. Otherwise, consult your doctor.

4. Drain Water Heater When Not in Use– Save from Leaking!

In order to maintain the water flowing properly and keeping it fresh, it is a good idea to drain the water from your water heater when you are not using it, as if you are not currently living in your RV. Even after draining it after each camping trip, it may be really beneficial. An important argument for not allowing water to sit is that it will begin to smell really unpleasant. In the same way that we spoke before getting rid of that terrible smell that comes from the hot water and sulfur, it operates in the same way that a hot spring does because of the heat and sulfur.

If the water is allowed to remain in the container without being removed, it may cause your pipes to leak.

Simply draining the water on a regular basis will benefit you in the long term!

Tip: What to do if your Water Heater is already leaking?

Immediately switch off the water heater as well as the water supply that is linked to the tank if your water heater is already leaking. Check to see that the tank’s power supply has been turned off, and then look at the tank. Check to check if there is a loose valve, such as the drain valve, which might be the source of some leaks. Check the pressure, see if the tank is fractured, and look at the bottom of the heater for cracks or other issues. Even if it is an issue that you cannot solve on your own, it is important to take it to an RV shop that can assist you, especially if there are cracks in the pipes.

5. Install Hot Water Heater Bypass Valve

You may or may not already have a hot water heater bypass valve installed, but it is critical to determine if you do or do not have one. This bypass valve aids in the prevention of any freezing of the valves, so preventing your water heater from freezing during the winter. Looking at your water heater and seeing whether or not there is a pipe connecting the hot and cold pipes is one way to determine whether or not you have a bypass valve in place. If you have a bypass valve attached, you have a bypass valve in your system.

You should check that your system is set up with three valves perpendicular to each other, then turn the bypass valve parallel to them to ensure that the system is working properly.

The bypass will aid in the prevention of freezes between the various parts of the tank.

6. Drain Water Heater when Winterizing RV

Draining your RV while winterizing it is also a critical step to take at this period. It will be necessary to re-drain it when it is cold in order to ensure you have sufficient water for the winter season. By removing the water, you can help prevent any pipes from freezing and cracking in the future. Because of this, it’s critical to put on the winter bypass valve to ensure that the pipes don’t freeze or shatter, causing you to deal with even more difficulties once you’re back on the road. Make careful to turn off the main water supply from whichever source your tank is connected to before starting the process of draining it.

It is possible that there is still water in the tank, which is not a desirable thing to have.

(Video) RV Water Heaters - Learn about your RV water heater

This flushing will aid in the removal of all of the water. Investing in an RV water heater tank flusher tool may prove to be beneficial in the emptying process. With the use of this equipment, you can minimize the quantity of water required to clean out your water heater tank.

7. Drain/ Flush Twice a Year

During the course of the year, it is recommended that you empty and clean the tank at least twice to ensure that it performs correctly. It is especially beneficial if you use your RV and water heater on a regular basis. Make frequent use of the storage tank to ensure that it lasts for a long time. It’s also possible, as I said earlier, to drain or flush your hot water heater after each camping trip you take. The reason this is so crucial is that: 1) you will prevent unpleasant odors caused by hot water and sulfur; and 2) you will avoid any pipes breaking and leaking as a result.

8. Turn Bypass Valve Back off in RV after Winter

Remember to turn the bypass valve back on when you return to the road after the Winter season since you won’t be able to use it if it isn’t cold outdoors when you return to the road after the Winter season. Double-check to see that the bypass valve has been reset to its original position. It’s possible that you forgot to turn the bypass valve back off in the Spring, which is why you’re having problems experiencing hot water in the Summer. Another thing to check is whether or not there is water in the hot water heater tank once more.

9. Install an Anode rod

If you put an anode rod in your water heater tank, corrosion will be prevented from causing damage to the tank itself. Instead of corroding your tank, it will corrode the rod instead. Only thing to remember is to keep an eye on the rod because when it becomes rusted, it will need to be replaced with a new rod. Water will naturally attempt to erode your tank, which is why it is so crucial to have an anode rod installed, since only the rod will corrode, resulting in a longer service life for your water heater tank!

10. Don’t Waste the Hot Water! Use S paringly

One feature of your hot water heater that you may have noticed is that it is smaller than one that would be suitable for a house. As a result, you should be aware of the fact that it can only deliver a limited amount of hot water before it becomes ineffective. In comparison, a standard house can hold around 50 gallons of water whereas hot water tanks hold 6-10 gallons of hot water per day. Isn’t there a significant difference? Try to adhere to the following guidelines to prevent running out of water too quickly: Always remember to take shorter showers and to use less hot water while washing the dishes.

That, as well as being cautious if you have a heating tank that is powered by the heat generated by the engine. The amount of hot water available to use may be reduced if the engine hasn’t been operated for a long period of time.

11. What to Do if Pressure Temperature Valve is Dripping

So the good news is that simply when your pressure temperature valve is pouring, it does not necessarily imply that there is a significant problem with the valve. This simply indicates that the water in the system expands when it is heated in the heat exchanger. There are certain tanks that have air spaces in them, which helps to reduce the amount of leaking that occurs. Because the water will absorb the air, it may be necessary to refill it at some point. Simple steps include turning off the water heater tank, shutting down the whole water system, and then opening one of the hot water taps to do this.

You can then allow the pressure-temperature relief valve to shut before turning off the faucet once again until the problem is resolved.

Related Questions:

How long does it take for an RV Water Heater to heat up to temperature? RV water heaters normally take 20 minutes to heat the water to a comfortable temperature. Another factor is how many gallons of water are in it; for example, if the container holds just 10 gallons, it will take longer to heat up. Is it a good idea to leave my RV water heater on on all the time? It is OK to leave the RV water heater turned on all of the time, just like you would a typical water heater in your house; but, you must ensure that there is always water in the water heater.

How long a shower with a 6 gal water heater?

09-22-2007, 11:43 PM1
Streamline ImperialCurrently Looking.Bellflower, CaliforniaJoin Date: Jan 2007Posts: 110How long a shower with a 6 gal water heater?

I’m getting ready to install a new water heater, and I wanted to know how long of a shower you can get with a 6 gallon heater?Not that you have limitless water or anything, but it is lame to be “almost done” when the thing runs cold.I’m trying to decide if I should go with a 10 gallon instead.Tankless would be lovely, but I’m not doing that this time around.Thanks,-Silversausage_It seems I love the mountains and deserts more than my friends do. I sure miss them!1971 Streamline Imperial project “Silver Snausage”, 1985 Coleman tent trailer, 1964 Little Dipper, 1975 Northwest “Proto Toyhauler”, 2004 Harbor Freight folding, still seeking my Airstream.

09-22-2007, 11:45 PM2
Rivet MasterCurrently Looking.Florissant, USAJoin Date: Oct 2006Posts: 5,083If you have the resources I would go 10 gallon if it were me.My 6 gallon works just fine for me, but I take quick showers with the water saver feature while at camp.Steve
09-22-2007, 11:45 PM3
Rivet Master2005 25′ International CCD1954 22′ Flying Cloud1957 22′ Flying CloudSimi Valley, CaliforniaJoin Date: Dec 2005Posts: 2,251Images:2mr sausage,are you boondocking or are you planning full hookups?smell right
09-23-2007, 12:09 AM4
Streamline ImperialCurrently Looking.Bellflower, CaliforniaJoin Date: Jan 2007Posts: 110

Boondocking mostly, which obviously limits the overall quantity of water.That limitation acknowleged, I’m still interested in longer rather than shorter.After a long day of quadding or prospecting, it sounds very good for the muscles.Also, a worthwhile shower might convince my girlfriend to go camping too once in awhile.I’m working with a smaller trailer, so every cubic inch is precious, which is why I’m asking about the 6 gallon ones.Thanks again,-SilverSausage_It seems I love the mountains and deserts more than my friends do. I sure miss them!1971 Streamline Imperial project “Silver Snausage”, 1985 Coleman tent trailer, 1964 Little Dipper, 1975 Northwest “Proto Toyhauler”, 2004 Harbor Freight folding, still seeking my Airstream.

09-23-2007, 12:15 AM5
Rivet Master2005 25′ International CCD1954 22′ Flying Cloud1957 22′ Flying CloudSimi Valley, CaliforniaJoin Date: Dec 2005Posts: 2,251Images:2Quote:Originally Posted bySilvrSausageBoondocking mostly,\ MASSIVE SNIP //I’m working with a smaller trailer, so every cubic inch is precious, which is why I’m asking about the 6 gallon ones.Thanks again,-SilverSausagemr sausage,6 gallon.yours,in heat
09-23-2007, 12:24 AM6
Rivet Master1963 16′ Bambi1962 22′ SafariYreka, CaliforniaJoin Date: Mar 2006Posts: 1,936With six gallons you have time to get wet, soap up, rinse off.Maybe wash your hair if very quick about it.To conserve turn the water on/off inbetween the soaping, rinsing, etc.Then, if any hot water is left you can enjoy it on a sore muscle for a minute.No luxury showers while boondocking it will use your fresh water up quickly!I have often taken a camping shower, the kind that has a solarized plastic cover you hang in a tree and it gets warm in the summer and fall during the day while the sun hits it.It can be used to wash hair, etc. and then you can use your real shower for more “therapy”.Or, if you are really saving water, you can wash your hair in a bucket of water and rinse. save the water and use it for the toilet.Sounds a bit icky, but the soapy water won’t hurt your black tank, and it will save water when times are tight!Good luck.If longer showers are most important, I would bite the bullet and go with an on-demand system.Mrs. NorCal Bambi (traveling in S Tardis)
09-23-2007, 12:53 AM7
Rivet Master1966 24′ TradewindPlacerville, CaliforniaJoin Date: Apr 2006Posts: 3,328Images:2Our new 6 gallon Atwood is just fine for me. I don’t like long showers anyway so our shower in our home is a hand-held one like in the Trade Wind so I am used to ‘Navy’ showers. Lynn hasn’t found it problematic either, at least she hasn’t complained. Plenty of hot water to wash hair too. I almost bought a 10 gal. but the old Bowen 6 gal. had a good heat recovery time so I figured the Atwood would be at least that good. It is even better. I bought the gas/electric so when we have hookups the water is heated electrically._Neil and Lynn HolmanFreshAir12407Avatar;Kirk Creek, Big Sur, Ca. coast.1966 Trade Wind1971 Buick Centurion convertible455 cid1969 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight455 cid
09-23-2007, 08:04 AM8
3 Rivet Member2003 25′ ClassicBirmingham, AlabamaJoin Date: Mar 2007Posts: 121I think our Airstream has the 6-gallon hot water tank. If we have full hook-ups I indulge in some lengthly hot showers. No problems whatsoever.Plus, I suspect the 6-gallon tank might get hot a little faster than the 10-gallon?Of course if you are boondocking, that’s a different story altogether. “Navy showers” are a must, mainly due to grey water capacity.
09-23-2007, 08:39 AM9
Rivet Master1971 27′ OverlanderCentral, OhioJoin Date: Jun 2006Posts: 2,365Images:13Silversausage,What size is in it now. We just put a 10 gallon in – had a 10 gallon before. If you have a 10 you’ll have to skin the trailer to go to a 6. Conversely, you’ll need to cut the body out to go up from a 6.
09-23-2007, 09:34 AM10
Moderator2004 30′ Classic SlideoutFenton, MissouriJoin Date: Mar 2002Posts: 10,129A lot depends on the temperature of the incoming water.Spring and late season showers using campground water supplies tend to run the tank out faster due to the colder water coming into the heater.Another way to lengthen the hot water supply is to have a dual moded tank.One that works on both electric and gas.I have one of those tanks and when at a site with electric, I use electric only to heat the water.At shower time I flip on the gas switch and we are now running both sources of heat, thus elongating the amount of hot water available and recovering the tank much faster.Jack_Jack CanaveraSTL Mo.AIR56S/OS 15’04 Classic 30′ S.O.,’03 GMC Savana 2500,’14 Honda CTX 700
10-06-2007, 03:16 PM11
Rivet Master1972 25′ TradewindNorth Vancouver, British ColumbiaJoin Date: Feb 2006Posts: 3,422Images:23Quote:Originally Posted byFreshAirOur new 6 gallon Atwood is just fine for me. I don’t like long showers anyway so our shower in our home is a hand-held one like in the Trade Wind so I am used to ‘Navy’ showers. Lynn hasn’t found it problematic either, at least she hasn’t complained. Plenty of hot water to wash hair too. I almost bought a 10 gal. but the old Bowen 6 gal. had a good heat recovery time so I figured the Atwood would be at least that good. It is even better. I bought the gas/electric so when we have hookups the water is heated electrically.Was switching out the old Bowen for the new Atwood an easy thing to do?I want to replace my old Bowen with an Atwood with electronic ignition so that I can turn it on off from inside the trailer.Have you tried using the electric heating with yours?How well does it work?Thanks!_Cameronthe Labradors, KaiSammNorth Vancouver, BCLive! Life’s a banquet and most poor suckers are starving to death!- Mame Dennis
10-06-2007, 04:03 PM12
Rivet Master1984 31′ Airstream310Dunsmuir, CaliforniaJoin Date: May 2004Posts: 1,336Images:16We’ve never run out of hot water with our six gallon even when we have full hookups and are not trying to conserve.Of course we’re not TRYING to run it out of hot water either._If you want others to be happy, practice compassion.If you want to be happy, practice compassion- The Dalai Lama1984 310 Limited MotorhomeCourtesy Parking (W/S/E/Wi-Fi) on I-5 in Northern California, 70 miles from Oregon border
10-06-2007, 04:15 PM13
Moderator2015 25′ FB Flying Cloud2012 23′ FB Flying Cloud2005 25′ SafariSanta Rosa Beach, FloridaJoin Date: Jul 2006Posts: 12,538Images:5We have a 6 gallon water heater, and have found that you can shower pretty much as long as you want because the unit recycles really fast. The only times that we have found this not to be true is when we have camped very easly or very late in the season up north, and the water coming out of the ground was near freezing._SuEllynBrian McCabe WBCCI3628-AIR14872 -TACFL-7 2015FC 25′ FB (Lucy) with HAHA 2020 Silverado 2500 (Vivian)
10-06-2007, 09:14 PM14
Rivet Master1966 24′ TradewindPlacerville, CaliforniaJoin Date: Apr 2006Posts: 3,328Images:2Quote:Originally Posted bycameront120Was switching out the old Bowen for the new Atwood an easy thing to do? I want to replace my old Bowen with an Atwood with electronic ignition so that I can turn it on off from inside the trailer. Have you tried using the electric heating with yours? How well does it work? Thanks!We like our 6 gal. Switching it out was not too bad. Yes you can switch it on from in the bathroom and it heats up pronto. I will post that photo with the photos of the project which I planned to create a thread with. So I better get to it. Right at this mnute our grand sons are here and my daughter and I are about to go out the door to retrieve the Chinese dinner we ordered. I will post that thread ASAP. Promise. I will PM an alert to you._Neil and Lynn HolmanFreshAir12407Avatar;Kirk Creek, Big Sur, Ca. coast.1966 Trade Wind1971 Buick Centurion convertible455 cid1969 Oldsmobile Ninety Eight455 cid
10-07-2007, 12:06 AM16
Rivet Master1956 22′ Flying CloudVenice, CaliforniaJoin Date: Sep 2005Posts: 672there is only one tankless hot water heater manufacturer that is approved for rv installationPrecisionTemp.com: For Recreational Vehicles and Boats._david*by asking the above question, i verify that i have already used the search feature to the best of my ability.
10-07-2007, 07:02 AM17
3 Rivet Member2010 28′ Flying CloudEscondido, CaliforniaJoin Date: Feb 2007Posts: 196Be careful, the new Atwoods with DSI are deeper than the old Bowden. I had a furnace duct clearence problem in my 23′ 1976 Safari.
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FAQs

How long does it take for a 6-gallon water heater to warm up? ›

Here are some common heat up times for different water heaters, assuming the appliances are new and properly sized for the home: Electric storage tank water heater: 60–80 minutes. Propane storage tank water heater: 30–40 minutes. Propane tankless water heater: 0 minutes.

How long does it take to heat 6 gallons of water? ›

The average gas heater takes between 30 and 40 minutes to fully heat up the water in its tank. The average electric heater takes about twice as long as the average gas heater to fully heat up the water in its tank, so you can expect it to take between an hour and an hour and 20 minutes to heat up.

How long does it take a water heater to heat up after adjusting temperature? ›

For gas water heaters, it usually takes on average 30 to 40 minutes for the water in the tank to be completely heated.

How long of a shower can you take with a 6 gallon water heater? ›

If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. We have a 6 gallon water heater, and have found that you can shower pretty much as long as you want because the unit recycles really fast.

Is a 6 gallon hot water heater enough? ›

But whatever the reason, a 6-gallon water heater is a popular size and works well for most homeowners. Six-gallon water heaters are small enough that they're relatively inexpensive, yet large enough that they're able to deliver plenty of hot water to meet the majority of needs.

Does turning up water heater make hot water last longer? ›

Turn up the thermostat on the hot water heater. One of the easiest ways to make a hot shower last longer is by using less hot water while it's at a higher temperature. To do this, turn up the temperature on the thermostat that's attached to the hot water heater tank.

How long does it take for water to get hot again in the shower? ›

Average Water Heater Recovery Times

60-70 minutes (for a gas tank water heater) 120 minutes (for an electric tank water heater)

How long until hot water comes back? ›

How long does it take for hot water to return? Typically, a water heater tank takes 30 to 40 minutes to heat up so if your water heater is still working, you can count on having more hot water come back in that amount of time as long as your system is still working adequately.

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